Health myth debunked | Eurasia Diary - ednews.net

22 August, Thursday


Health myth debunked

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A new review of thousands of published studies showed that doctors have been providing hundreds of medical advice that are actually based on myths. The findings can be alarming since you may have been following a routine that might actually cause more harm than the expected health benefits. 

Researchers analyzed more than 3,000 studies published between 2003 and 2017 in the journals JAMA, the Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings showed that doctors still follow nearly 400 routine practices that are already contradicted by science, The New York Times reported Monday. 

“You come away with a sense of humility,” Vinay Prasad, one of the researchers from Oregon Health and Science University, said. “Very smart and well-intentioned people came to practice these things for many, many years. But they were wrong.”

Among hundreds of debunked practices, this article is exposing seven of the most common medical myths that are being widely followed across the globe.

Myth: Deliver Baby ASAP If Pregnant Woman Breaks Water Prematurely

Obstetricians fear that the baby may become exposed to bacteria if amniotic fluid spills out a few weeks before a woman’s due date. This led experts to require delivering the baby immediately to avoid infection. 

However, a clinical trial showed that waiting for labor to begin naturally after the water breaks has more health benefits. Researchers said that no risk for infection occurs and newborns left to gestate appeared healthier and with a lower risk of death.

Myth: Exposing Kids To Peanuts Before Age 3 Increases Allergy Risk

Parents commonly receive advice from pediatricians that they should keep kids away from peanuts for the first three years of life. However, scientific research says otherwise. 

There are no elevated risk for allergies found in children even one year of age. 

Myth: Using Step Counters, Calorie Trackers Can Help Cut Weight

The rise of mobile devices and wearable technology promised to help people get into a healthy lifestyle. However, a study that followed 470 people for two years found that those who wore devices tracking the steps they took and calories they burned daily lost less weight compared to people who followed standard exercise.

Myth: Taking Testosterone Treatment Can Help Keep Memory

Some older men tend to take more testosterone treatments to help maintain their memory. This comes from older studies that suggested middle-aged men who had higher testosterone levels tend to have better preserved tissue in some parts of their brains. 

However, latest clinical trials showed that testosterone does not help older men avoid memory loss.

Myth: Ginkgo Biloba Helps Avoid Memory Loss, Dementia

It is a supplement made from the leaves of ginkgo trees. Doctors have been promoting the use of ginkgo biloba to preserve memory. 

However, a 2008 large-scale study confirmed that the supplement is not effective in improving mental health. 

Myth: Eliminating All Dust Mites, Mice, Cockroaches Can Prevent Asthma Attacks

Many health experts believe that getting rid of pests inside the house could reduce the risk of asthma in children. However, a 2017 study showed that intensive pest management in homes was not effective in reducing frequency of asthma attacks. 

Myth: Fish Oil Helps Avoid Heart Disease

Fish oil contains omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to lower risk of heart disease. However, a study of 12,500 people showed that daily intake of omega-3 supplements has little to no effect when it comes to protecting the heart against health problems. 

Read more:

A new review of thousands of published studies showed that doctors have been providing hundreds of medical advice that are actually based on myths. The findings can be alarming since you may have been following a routine that might actually cause more harm than the expected health benefits. 

Researchers analyzed more than 3,000 studies published between 2003 and 2017 in the journals JAMA, the Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings showed that doctors still follow nearly 400 routine practices that are already contradicted by science, The New York Times reported Monday

“You come away with a sense of humility,” Vinay Prasad, one of the researchers from Oregon Health and Science University, said. “Very smart and well-intentioned people came to practice these things for many, many years. But they were wrong.”

Among hundreds of debunked practices, this article is exposing seven of the most common medical myths that are being widely followed across the globe.

Medical Daily

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